The Fiji Times » “Children are losing interest in studies”

0

Expect children to lose interest in their schoolwork if they haven’t studied during the pandemic, says psychotherapist Selina Kuruleca.

She said it was one of the many reasons children lost interest, adding that contracting the disease or witnessing the death of loved ones from COVID-19 may be a contributing factor to this.

Ms Kuruleca said the problem could be addressed through a multi-pronged approach across all sectors where mental health was on the agenda.

She said children should be able to access mental health services. Ms Kuruleca advised affected families to seek help.

Due to the uncertain future brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, children’s mental health is greatly affected, causing them to lose interest in their studies.

While addressing the concerns of worried parents, psychotherapist Selina Kuruleca said there were various reasons associated with this, adding that it could be due to fear of contracting COVID-19.

Ms Kuruleca said it could also be caused by those who contracted the disease and were recovering from it or by the death of a close family member from the pandemic.

“Uncertainty about what will happen when they return, for example my friends, my teachers, my classmates or will we still be like before COVID and will we be good friends, etc.,” she said. declared.

“They haven’t studied, so they don’t want to study and are not interested in their schoolwork.” Ms Kuruleca said some may even have started serial relationships and lost interest in their studies.

“Some may have had more positive experiences, such as supportive families, no job loss, etc. by breadwinners; while some children may have suffered negatively from loss of income, illness, lack of support, fear of continued illness, etc.

Ms Kuruleca said the problem could be addressed through a multi-pronged approach across all sectors where mental health was on the agenda.

“Where there is a workplace mental health policy, where employers have employee assistance programs, children need to be able to access mental health services.

“These activities that promote the protection of an individual’s mental health are put in place, and this should be done in all sectors.”

Ms Kuruleca advised affected families to seek help.

“Ask for help, call the helplines, go see a professional, people are available to help you.”

Meanwhile, the latest available estimates from the United Nations Children’s Fund showed that more than one in seven adolescents between the ages of 10 and 19 live with a diagnosed mental disorder globally.

Share.

Comments are closed.