Des Moines man receives breakthrough treatment for Alzheimer’s disease

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A man from Des Moines has dedicated his life to advocating for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Today, he is one of the first in the country to receive a promising new treatment for the disease. Mike Zeundel was 66 when he was told he suffered from mild cognitive impairment, the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. He said the day he was diagnosed it was like “a punch in the stomach.” A tough time for him, but he says his response was to fight back. Although devastating, it was no surprise, Zeundel lost both parents to Alzheimer’s disease. A few years ago, he discovered that he had the two genes capable of carrying the disease. He said: “I was their caretaker, and then I was subsequently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease about a year ago.” He also said it took him a while to decide if he wanted to know. Once the diagnosis was diagnosed, the next steps were clear. He wanted to become a lawyer first and then search for a facility that distributed Aduhelm, formerly known as Aducanumab, a treatment approved by the FDA in June. Treatment aims to attack the amyloid protein in the brain to help improve cognitive memory function over time. Zeundel said the process to get the treatment took time, but receiving it didn’t take long. “The actual procedure for getting an infusion was quite simple, it was a regular intravenous infusion into your hand or arm, then you sit in a nice, comfortable chair for an hour while the medicine is infused,” he said. he declared. For now, he has said he will have to go back every month for the next year to receive treatment at an Arizona facility. “What drove me there … it’s really a matter of time. My children, my daughters both have an APOE4 gene that indicates Alzheimer’s disease, I have two of those genes. My parents. died of Alzheimer’s disease … I would do anything to have another year, two years, months, weeks or days with my family, so yes I ‘I will absolutely continue this path “, Zeundel said.

A man from Des Moines has dedicated his life to advocating for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Today, he is one of the first in the country to receive a promising new treatment for the disease.

Mike Zeundel was 66 when he was told he suffered from mild cognitive impairment, the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. He said the day he was diagnosed it was like “a punch in the stomach.” A tough time for him, but he says his response was to fight back.

Although devastating, it was no surprise, Zeundel lost both parents to Alzheimer’s disease. A few years ago, he discovered that he had the two genes capable of carrying the disease.

He said: “I was their caretaker, and then I was subsequently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease about a year ago.”

He also said it took him a while to decide if he wanted to know.

Once diagnosed, the next steps were clear. He wanted to become a lawyer first and then search for a facility that distributed Aduhelm, formerly known as Aducanumab, a treatment approved by the FDA in June. Treatment aims to attack the amyloid protein in the brain to help improve cognitive memory function over time.

Zeundel said the process to get the treatment took time, but receiving it didn’t take long.

“The actual procedure for getting an infusion was quite simple, it was a regular intravenous infusion into your hand or arm, then you sit in a nice, comfortable chair for an hour while the medicine is infused,” he said. he declared.

For now, he has said he will have to go back every month for the next year to receive treatment at an Arizona facility.

“What drove me there … it’s really a matter of time. My children, my daughters both have an APOE4 gene that indicates Alzheimer’s disease, I have two of those genes. My parents. died of Alzheimer’s disease … do anything to have another year, two years, months, weeks or days with my family, so yeah, I will absolutely go that route, ”said Zeundel.


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